Training For Singing For The Brain

Ep 33 How to Sing Mix Part 1

How to sing mix, or how to sing with a mixis a very common question. Inside this tutorial, I'll define and demonstrate mix. Warning:normally I try to avoid this, but in this tutorial I get a little 'geeky' about singing.(Vocal geek) Hi, I'm Chuck Gilmore with Power To Sing. How to sing in a mix. Well, whatis a mixé A mix is a mixture or blend of at least two things. When singing, you're ina mix if you have a mixture of chest voice and head voice. Ahahah. If you sing onlywith chest voice, you have no mix. Ahhhh. If you start in chest and sing higher andbreak or flip into falsetto, you have no mix. Ahahah.because you've lost the connectionto your chest voice. If, when singing, you

bring falsetto down into the area of the chestvoice that is supposed to be chest, there is no mix. It's only falsetto. Ahahah. Amix can only exist if the vocal cords remain connected. If your vocal cords break intofalsetto and you do not reconnect, you have no mix. It's only falsetto. Ahahah. Mixis made with connected vocal cords and a blend of chest resonance and head resonance. Now,where is mix in the voiceé There are several schools of thought about when and where you'rein mix. Some define mix as only occurring in the vocal bridges, passaggi. When singingin chest voice, as you sing higher, and while keeping the vocal cords together, the resonancebegins to move higher from your chest into

your head cavities. The resonance splits sothere's a mixture, or a mix of both chest and head resonance. This split occurs in thebridge or passaggi. After getting through the first bridge the singer encounters a secondbridge and then a third bridge. For women, there are even more bridges. With each bridge,there is a blend of overtones from the register below and the register above. Lower overtonesdamping, or dropping out and higher overtones coming in. As a result of this process, manybelieve that mix is only occurring in the actual bridges. Some believe if the vocalcords remain connected while the resonance has split into both chest and head cavitiesthat mix is always present, both in and in

between the bridges. In other words, everythingis mix. At this point in my singing and teaching, I think it's a combination of these two. Pavarottiis reported to have said that singing was like a repeating figure 8. Seth Riggs concluded,and I believe like Seth, that Pavarotti was describing the repeated narrowing into thebridge and the opening into the new register and so on upward. In my opinion, if the vocalcords remain connected, there's always some chest residue, even if it's very slight. Soeven in the highest head voice, if the cords have remained connected, that seems like mixto me, even if it's 100 to 1, it's still a mix. At a certain point, if the cords remainconnected, does it really matter if we say

it's mix or connected super head voiceé Theproblem is, what happens to mix when you sing down below the first bridge into chesté Well,you could definitely bring mix down into the chest register. So, I understand how thatcan be mix, but in most voices, you can only do that so long before the chest voice takesover. How, then, can that be a mixé A third concept that has helpful for me, is 'maintainingthe verticalquot;.(Vocal Geek) This is mentioned in the book, quot;The Voice of the Mind', by E.HerbertCaesari. Imagine a vertical sound beam started by the vocal cords and shootingupward into the mouth. In head voice, this resonating sound beam, if it maintains thevertical direction, will angle slightly backward

and penetrate into the head cavities abovethe mouth. Ahhh. Ahahah. In chest, there is still a vertical sound beam, but it beginsto angle slightly forward and engage the hard palette. In my opinion, to lose the verticalwhile in chest voice, is to grab the vocal cord, squeeze and close the throat and jamthe sound beam down into the throat. Ahahah.Ahhh. The tone can barely escape and has no roundness,no fullness and no appeal. To me, this is not mix. Maintaining the vertical, even ifcompletely in the lower chest voice, creates an upward lift in the tone. The sound beamresonates on the hard palette appropriately. This seems to recruit more than just chestvoice by adding a rounder, fuller tone, as

What is Singing for the Brain An Alzheimers Society service for people affected by dementia 2015

Sue, quot;You don't have to be able to sing tocome to Singing for the Brain. You just have to want to sing.quot; John, quot;Singing. it's good.quot; June, quot;You can let rip when you want to.quot; John, quot;And they are all um. songs that you know.quot; *Singing quot;I've got a wonderful feeling.* Sue, quot;Singing for the Brain is a singing group, yes, for people with dementia and for their carers but it's also more than that because it reallydoes connect them socially together. We start with tea and coffee and chat afterthat time then we all get together in a circle and we do some gentle exercising in our chairs, and we sing a welcome song, and then we also sing lots of wellknown songs andthat involves people with dementia and

their carers together and volunteers as welland we we have a really good time.quot; June, quot;Oh it's lovely. Have you ever sung in a choir with peopleé Y'know, it's different from just singing on your own. Y'know, just singing with other people, it's totally different isn't itéquot; John quot;Yeah.quot; Sue, quot;I love the sense of togethernessthe way that people really bond, that the carers and the people withdementia, 'cause we're all equal when we're in that circle singing, they're justfeeling the music together and that for me is really special because that'swhere the bonding comes in and the empathy among

all the people in the groupquot; John, quot;Everybody has a similar problem, um. partners with similar problems and everything else.quot; June, quot;It's when you're talking to somebody, it's not completely sort of new, because everybody has different sorts of problems, don't they.quot; Sue, quot;It's often a huge relief to find that they're not on their own but thereare other people who are struggling like them and so they really bond over tea and coffee and chat, sharing anecdotes sharing the problems they don't feel alone anymore.quot; Jim, quot;When you meet up with people that are in the same boat as yourself, at different stages, you can learn from each other.quot; Anita, quot;I've seen people start here, and they come in and they look quite stressed and sad, and then by the end of

maybe the first session they just look totally different. They look more relaxed and as though they've had an afternoon out. It seems to have a magical kind of content, which is so inspiring for people.quot; *Singing, quot;what a wonderful worldquot;*.

How playing an instrument benefits your brain Anita Collins

Did you know that every timemusicians pick up their instruments, there are fireworks going offall over their brainé On the outside,they may look calm and focused, reading the music and making the preciseand practiced movements required. But inside their brains,there's a party going on. How do we know thisé Well, in the last few decades, neuroscientists have madeenormous breakthroughs

in understanding how our brains workby monitoring them in real time with instruments likefMRI and PET scanners. When people are hooked upto these machines, tasks, such as readingor doing math problems, each have corresponding areas of the brainwhere activity can be observed. But when researchers gotthe participants to listen to music, they saw fireworks. Multiple areas of their brainswere lighting up at once,

as they processed the sound, took it apart to understand elementslike melody and rhythm, and then put it all back togetherinto unified musical experience. And our brains do all this workin the split second between when we first hear the musicand when our foot starts to tap along. But when scientists turnedfrom observing the brains of music listeners to those of musicians, the little backyard fireworksbecame a jubilee.

It turns out that while listeningto music engages the brain in some pretty interesting activities, playing music is the brain's equivalentof a fullbody workout. The neuroscientists sawmultiple areas of the brain light up, simultaneously processingdifferent information in intricate, interrelated,and astonishingly fast sequences. But what is it about making musicthat sets the brain alighté The research is still fairly new,

but neuroscientistshave a pretty good idea. Playing a musical instrument engages practically every areaof the brain at once, especially the visual,auditory, and motor cortices. As with any other workout, disciplined,structured practice in playing music strengthens those brain functions,allowing us to apply that strength to other activities. The most obvious difference betweenlistening to music and playing it

is that the latter requiresfine motor skills, which are controlledin both hemispheres of the brain. It also combines the linguisticand mathematical precision, in which the left hemisphereis more involved, with the novel and creativecontent that the right excels in. For these reasons,playing music has been found to increase the volume and activityin the brain's corpus callosum, the bridge between the two hemispheres,

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