Classical Guitar Lessons Tabs

Ep 33 How to Sing Mix Part 1

How to sing mix, or how to sing with a mixis a very common question. Inside this tutorial, I'll define and demonstrate mix. Warning:normally I try to avoid this, but in this tutorial I get a little 'geeky' about singing.(Vocal geek) Hi, I'm Chuck Gilmore with Power To Sing. How to sing in a mix. Well, whatis a mixé A mix is a mixture or blend of at least two things. When singing, you're ina mix if you have a mixture of chest voice and head voice. Ahahah. If you sing onlywith chest voice, you have no mix. Ahhhh. If you start in chest and sing higher andbreak or flip into falsetto, you have no mix. Ahahah.because you've lost the connectionto your chest voice. If, when singing, you

bring falsetto down into the area of the chestvoice that is supposed to be chest, there is no mix. It's only falsetto. Ahahah. Amix can only exist if the vocal cords remain connected. If your vocal cords break intofalsetto and you do not reconnect, you have no mix. It's only falsetto. Ahahah. Mixis made with connected vocal cords and a blend of chest resonance and head resonance. Now,where is mix in the voiceé There are several schools of thought about when and where you'rein mix. Some define mix as only occurring in the vocal bridges, passaggi. When singingin chest voice, as you sing higher, and while keeping the vocal cords together, the resonancebegins to move higher from your chest into

your head cavities. The resonance splits sothere's a mixture, or a mix of both chest and head resonance. This split occurs in thebridge or passaggi. After getting through the first bridge the singer encounters a secondbridge and then a third bridge. For women, there are even more bridges. With each bridge,there is a blend of overtones from the register below and the register above. Lower overtonesdamping, or dropping out and higher overtones coming in. As a result of this process, manybelieve that mix is only occurring in the actual bridges. Some believe if the vocalcords remain connected while the resonance has split into both chest and head cavitiesthat mix is always present, both in and in

between the bridges. In other words, everythingis mix. At this point in my singing and teaching, I think it's a combination of these two. Pavarottiis reported to have said that singing was like a repeating figure 8. Seth Riggs concluded,and I believe like Seth, that Pavarotti was describing the repeated narrowing into thebridge and the opening into the new register and so on upward. In my opinion, if the vocalcords remain connected, there's always some chest residue, even if it's very slight. Soeven in the highest head voice, if the cords have remained connected, that seems like mixto me, even if it's 100 to 1, it's still a mix. At a certain point, if the cords remainconnected, does it really matter if we say

it's mix or connected super head voiceé Theproblem is, what happens to mix when you sing down below the first bridge into chesté Well,you could definitely bring mix down into the chest register. So, I understand how thatcan be mix, but in most voices, you can only do that so long before the chest voice takesover. How, then, can that be a mixé A third concept that has helpful for me, is 'maintainingthe verticalquot;.(Vocal Geek) This is mentioned in the book, quot;The Voice of the Mind', by E.HerbertCaesari. Imagine a vertical sound beam started by the vocal cords and shootingupward into the mouth. In head voice, this resonating sound beam, if it maintains thevertical direction, will angle slightly backward

and penetrate into the head cavities abovethe mouth. Ahhh. Ahahah. In chest, there is still a vertical sound beam, but it beginsto angle slightly forward and engage the hard palette. In my opinion, to lose the verticalwhile in chest voice, is to grab the vocal cord, squeeze and close the throat and jamthe sound beam down into the throat. Ahahah.Ahhh. The tone can barely escape and has no roundness,no fullness and no appeal. To me, this is not mix. Maintaining the vertical, even ifcompletely in the lower chest voice, creates an upward lift in the tone. The sound beamresonates on the hard palette appropriately. This seems to recruit more than just chestvoice by adding a rounder, fuller tone, as

8 Guitar Chords You Must Know Beginner Guitar Lessons

Hey I'm Nate Savage. In this lesson I'm goingto teach you eight guitar chords that you must know if you're a guitar player. Now,if you already know these chords that's fine, but stick around, I'm gonna be giving sometips on making your chords sound great and clean, and your chord transitions sound smoothtoo. Now, I believe it was the great Chet Atkinsthat said quot;I never made a dime above fivequot;, and he was referring to the fifth fret onthat. And one of the things he was talking about when he said that was open chords, hewas referring to open chords. And Chet Atkins being the virtuoso that he was, him sayingthat quot;I never made a dime above fivequot; is awesome

because it should tell you the importanceof these open chords that we're going to learn in this lesson. They're really important foryour career as a guitarist. The eight chords we're going to be tacklingin this lesson are: G major C major D major F major E major A major

E minor and A minor. You may be saying, quot;Nate that's a lot of chords, there's no way I could rememberthis in one lessonquot;. Don't worry about that. Space these out over a few weeks or even afew months, take them at your own pace. So let's get started with a G major chord.Bring your hand up to the guitar and pretend like you're holding an apple or something.That's a good posture to think about when you're making chords. Come put your thumbon the back of the neck right there, and just

relax. Make sure to relax when you're doingall of these. You shouldn't have a lot of excess tension in your hand. Now, when youare making this G major chord you can use either the first, second and third fingers,or you can use the second, third and fourth fingers. I would really really encourage youto use the second, third and fourth fingers. I'll show you later why, but for now try itwith the second, third and fourth. If it's too hard for you for right now you can usethe first, second and third. Okay, come and put your third finger on thethird fret of the low E string, and you'll want to notice a couple of things. I'm comingright down on the very tip of my finger. I'm

not being lazy and letting my finger hangover like this. That's a really important part of making chords. You want to come rightdown on the very tip of your finger. You'll also want to notice that my finger is rightbehind the fret wire right here. So those two things. Come right down on the very tipof your finger, and try to come right behind the frets too. So that's your first note. The second note, the second finger on thesecond fret of the A string right there. Again, the very tip of your finger. Now your pinkyis going to come grab the third fret of the high E string, right behind the fret, righton the tip of your finger. Strum all six strings.

And like I said, you can make this with yourfirst, second and third fingers if that's too hard for you, but I would really encourageyou to use your second, third and fourth fingers. Alright, let's move on to the C major chord,and one tip I want to give you here is don't kink your wrist too far this way when you'remaking when you're making chords. That can hurt after a while. So, I mean my wrist isn'tgoing to be perfectly straight, it's going to be a little bit bent, but don't kink ittoo far, otherwise it might start hurting you.So let's learn this C major chord. This is a great chord to let you know if you're comingdown on the very tips of your fingers, and

Play TEN guitar songs with two EASY chords Beginners first guitar lesson

Hi there, my name's Andy and I'm gonnashow you the easiest two chords to play on guitar and then show you how to play them in achord sequence so that you know how to play along to any of the songs that are on my web site already, and thisis an example of an absolute first lesson with me you can use this tutorial so that you knowwhat guitar lessons are going to be like or to get a head start before your firstlesson with me

so let's look at our first chord which isan 'E major' and lets get you in for a closeup So here we are. I've moved the camera so that not only can you see my cool Union Jack rug (which looks amazing)you can also see the guitar of from your point of view this should be theangle that you're looking at your guitar from. Here's a little bit on the anatomy; I'm gonnanumber the strings 1 through to 6; so that's from thethinnest 1 through to 6; so that's from thethinnest, to the thickest

I'm gonna number your frets 1, 2 and 3. Open strings are considered to be 0 zero fret I am I'm gonna get you to put your firstfinger on the thirdstring inside that first fret So thats string 1,2.3. String 3 and position wise you want to stay onthe tips of your fingers and you wanna be

at your side above the fret so the fret(even though the fret is technically the metal strip that goesdown) Fret 1 is this an area here the wooden part, of your fret board, and you want to put you first finger at this side of this area, the side closest toyou. kinda next to, or against the metal fret So that's where your first finger goes. Middle finger. 2nd fret on the 5th string. And 3rd finger.

directly underneath that middlefinger so that will be on the 4th string alsosecond fret. So, if we do those three again we have;one two. and three And, if you push those down with the tipsof the fingers kinda make a nice arch shape withyour hand kinda like a claw I guess (for want of a better term) Now press those down, and strum

every string with your right hand and that's what your first chord shouldsound like. Both these want to be at your side of the fret here, if it's over this side it might still ring out just about but you'll have to press downsignificantly harder to get this note to ring out if you pressover here you most likely be very surprised by howmuch you don't have to press down

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